Mobile Training Facilities

Where Virtual Reality Fits in Modern Medicine

Virtual reality represents the massive potential of innovative technology; so significant, in fact, that we have come to rely on virtual reality more than we may even imagine. In recent years, the medical field has been inundated with the positive aspects of virtual reality in our work and our patients’ lives. It may be assumed that, as a medical training organization dedicated to the continued use of human specimens, we have our misgivings about the integration of virtual reality into medicine. Not so. Here, we discuss a few of the areas in which VR is changing lives for the better.
Virtual Reality in the Healthcare Industry
Pain Management
There seems to be a prevalence of chronic pain and other instances in which pain management is paramount these days. In particular, virtual reality has proven beneficial for burn victims. In this instance, VR is used as a form of distraction therapy during wound care and physical therapy sessions. According to reports, patients playing entertaining VR games during these sessions are able to tolerate their treatment exceptionally well thanks to the blocking of pain pathways in the brain.
Stroke Recovery
It is well-understood that stroke and traumatic brain injury patients are under a time-crunch in terms of rehabilitation. The sooner that this begins, the more likely the patient is to regain the functions that were impaired by their injury or event. Innovative use of virtual reality is helping patients discover new ways to move fingers and limbs. Ultimately, the experience with VR leads patients to greater optimism and resiliency, through which the nervous system is better able to recover.
Exposure Therapy
For individuals being treated for anxiety, PTSD, and phobias, virtual reality holds particular value. Using VR, therapists can create triggering scenarios in […]

We Can’t Overlook Robotics in Surgical Success

The da Vinci robotic surgical platform was first introduced to medicine in 2000. At that time, the robotic device was approved for the performance of laparoscopic surgeries. Now, nearly two decades later, we see the use of robotics used far more expansively than ever before. A large percentage of the minimally-invasive surgical procedures that are performed today involve either the da Vinci or another robotic platform. Because robotics is not going away, it is vital that physicians become acquainted with the merits of robotic surgery and well-versed in communicating the details of robotic surgery with their patients.
Robotics as the Surgical Assistant
Platforms like the da Vinci do not take over the role of the surgeon; they act as a highly-trained assistant. Through robotics, surgeons can increase their efficiency by using smaller surgical instruments without affecting precision. Most robotic surgeries are performed by two surgeons; one in the direct presence of the patient and the other at the platform console, observing the surgical field and maneuvering robotic arms using computer controls.

One of the most significant ways that robotics assist surgeons is by reducing fatigue. This is possible because the surgeon operating robotic arms is seated for the duration of the procedure. Also, the cameras involved in robotic surgeries magnify the surgical field up to ten-times – and in 3D high definition.
Robotics Benefit Patients, Too
Robotic surgical devices have been developed for mutual gain. A surgeon who is not affected by fatigue is a better-performing surgeon. The availability of small surgical tools and robotic hands significantly reduces the need for long incisions and more “open” surgical technique. Smaller incisions are the cornerstone of minimally-invasive surgeries and the basis of faster, more comfortable recovery.
Uses of Robotics in Modern Medicine
Robotics […]

Human Tissue a Valuable Asset to Spinal Surgery Training

Hands-on learning has always been advantageous for medical personnel. Without it, the extent of familiarity and preparedness for surgical performance is not what it could be. Though advances in technology and protocols have been perceived as advantageous and indeed may be in some ways, clinical experience has confirmed that no simulation compares to the human cadaver when it comes to authenticity.

Because the field of medicine is in a continual state of growth, there is value in the development of new training methods for students as well as physicians seeking to advance their education. The use of human cadavers has become a debatable topic in recent years, with some arguing that virtual reality provides as much value to the surgeon in training. Research disagrees.

In a joint study, researchers from the Royal College of Surgeons in the UK and the University of Michigan observed the differences between electronic instruction and cadaver training using human models. At the conclusion of their study, researchers concluded that cadavers offer a more realistic model for the identification and understanding of anatomical structures. Of course they did, they were literal models with real tissue not simulated in form.

Spinal surgeries are some of the most complex and intricate to be performed, and many such surgical procedures are performed on an annual basis. It makes sense, then, that those tasked with the performance of surgeries such as cervical laminoplasty or lumbar laminectomy do what is necessary to be as highly qualified as possible.

Research studies involving medical students and surgeons involved in cadaver training have confirmed that the use of cadaver tissue increases competency and confidence in the operating room. Cadavers offer surgeons the opportunity to observe normal tissue as well as diseased tissue […]

The Value of Arthroscopic Training

The medical and surgical fields have been in such a state of innovation for so long that staying abreast of the latest and greatest trends may start to feel overwhelming. If you are in the orthopedic specialty, you want to procure the full extent of training necessary to improve patient outcomes. This may involve advanced education in the area of arthroscopic surgery.

Arthroscopy can be very useful for the surgeon who needs to observe the intricacies of any joint. Historically, physicians have relied on x-rays and other methods of imaging to extract meaningful data. Of course, there is nothing like an up-close-and-personal, real-time view, especially when this can be obtained in a minimally-invasive manner.

Arthroscopic procedures are commonly performed on joints including the:

Hips
Knees
Shoulders
Ankles
Wrists
Elbows

Each of these joints is complex and susceptible to a wide variety of injuries. Through arthroscopic surgery, an orthopedic physician can determine the source of pain and extent of an injury and, in many cases, make the necessary repairs through the same tiny incisions.

Surgery is a big decision for every patient. Knowing that a surgeon uses minimally-invasive arthroscopic technique may be the tipping point that allows a patient to feel more comfortable receiving care. Surgeons trained in arthroscopic technique can outline benefits to their patients. These may include:

High precision. Because observation of the joint takes place through a small camera at the end of a fiber-optic tube, a surgeon gains the most accurate view possible, without requiring a large, open surgery.
Lower risk. Surgery carries risk. This is precisely why it is a big decision for a patient to make. Because arthroscopy does not require large incisions, the surgical site remains localized and protected. Trauma to surrounding […]