Cadavers in Medical Training

Cadavers Facilitate the Ongoing Learning of Today’s Cardiac Surgeon

In the September 2017 issue of the Journal of Thoracic and
Cardiovascular Surgery, Dr. Marc Pelletier and colleagues discussed the ways in
which the field of cardiac surgery is rapidly evolving. One of the most
significant and beneficial changes taking place is the widespread availability
of interventional cardiac procedures. This singular transit from corrective to
interventional is having a profound impact on how cardiologists provide care.
This, in turn, is affecting the aspects of training a doctor needs to focus on
in the foreseeable future.

Surgery as Art

Cardiac surgery requires comprehensive familiarity with the
structural anatomy of the heart as well as with the artistry of cardiac
interventions. Essentially, the cardiologist must have wiring skills that are
above-average. Wiring skill is presented in almost every cardiac procedure and
cannot be stressed enough. According to Pelletier and his colleagues, a cardiac
surgeon should dedicate at least a few months of their initial training to wire
skills. Beyond this, ongoing education remains a critical aspect of high-level
patient care.

Simulation

There aren’t many medical specialties in which there is no mention of simulation as a beneficial means of continued education. What needs to be considered is the value of the various types of simulation available today. Due to immense improvement in digital fidelity, there has been a large push to integrate virtual reality simulators into medical education. As convenient as virtual reality is, and as detailed as this technique has become, there are limitations that cannot be overcome in the digital realm. The cardiac surgeon needs ongoing training that mimics real-world practice as much as possible. The best way to achieve this has been and quite possibly may always be to engage in cadaver training. Cadavers continue to provide the best interface for medical training, whether it is surgical technique or […]

How Cadaver Training Serves Medical Science and Development

The study of human cadaver tissues has served medicine well over the years. We routinely offer courses and supply adequate facilities for cadaver training revolving around cosmetic, orthopedic, and internal medicine procedures. Additionally, research indicates that cadaver labs provide valuable insights to companies interested in the development of medical devices.

Information is integral to development. With human cadaver training, it is possible to discern quite a lot about a procedure or device, including details such as:

Optimal placement of a device in actual human anatomy
Accurate spatial relationships between a device and its accessories and anatomical structures
Dimensional compatibility between new technology and human anatomy

Advanced Benefits to Further Innovation
Cadaver labs aren’t all about the tissue, as one may expect. This learning environment may also incorporate imaging equipment, surgical and interventional supplies, and other equipment that facilitates the fullest extent of observation possible. The implementation of appropriate mechanisms allows manufacturers to observe essential details relating to tissue/device interface, including how loading conditions will affect device performance.

Cadaver training improves development by alleviating guesswork:

Clinical testing performed on animal models is insufficient due to the significant anatomical differences that exist between animals and humans.
Animal models are not an accurate representation of the physiological disease states that exist in human anatomy.
Posture differences in animals (quadrupeds) and humans (bipeds) can affect device demonstration.

Innovation in the area of medical devices is integral to the ongoing improvement in patient outcomes. Med Ed Labs understands the value of research and development in the betterment of the medical community as a whole. Our team has been conducting successful human cadaver labs around the country for several years. The use of cadaver labs can assist with procedure discussion, identification of disease states and […]

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    Study Suggests the Value of Cadaver Labs in Orthopedic Training

Study Suggests the Value of Cadaver Labs in Orthopedic Training

Surgical simulation is a vital aspect of training residents in various specialties, including orthopedic surgery. This training provides exposure to surgical techniques, to the direct feedback of senior colleagues and peers. While simulation is valuable, the classic approach to surgical education is superseded by innovation in training modalities such as cadaver labs. According to research, the cadaver lab is a more objective tool than simulation, virtual reality, and animal models, and is attributed to the progression of surgical competency in orthopedic residents.

It is believed that sessions in a cadaver lab provide valuable surgical training that is only outdone by live surgery. Two procedures commonly performed in the cadaver lab include arthroscopy and arthroplasty, both of which require in-depth anatomical awareness not only of the structures of the knee joint but also of how they are manipulated during physical movement. Researchers have concluded that there is no way to accurately reproduce the complex aspects of joint replacements outside of the cadaver lab. Virtual reality simulation is included in this theory. But what about clinical practice?

In one recent study, researchers observed basic information regarding the use of cadaver laboratory practice in orthopedic surgery education. Researchers wanted to measure the value of cadaver training in the areas of implementation and trainee-interest. To do so, a survey was given to all orthopedic residents of the cadaver lab at the Italian Society of the Knee, Arthroscopy, Sports Traumatology, Cartilage and Orthopaedic Technology. Feedback was requested from just over 100 students who attended between 2013-2016.

According to data collected, 38 of 102 students returned their survey to researchers after the completion of their cadaver training. Of those 38 responses, 18 trainees focused their cadaver training on lower limb surgeries, and 20 […]

Simulation is No Match for Hands-On Cadaver Training

Several aspects of medicine have been improved with the advent of innovative new technologies and systems. One such advancement has been the use of virtual reality software and apps in the area of medial education. Because we have seen an increase in the sophistication and use of these apps, some say that virtual reality will at some point make hands-on bioskills training obsolete. Here, we discuss the value, as well as the limitations, of virtual reality in medical training.
Virtual Reality as a Reliable Instructor
The use of digital technologies is nothing new. Medical classrooms have incorporated a range of programs, including advanced medical imaging, 3D printing, multimedia, and even games, to disperse information to students and engage various abilities through interactive and effective methods. Virtual reality falls into the same category as these technologies; it is simply the latest and greatest to be developed, albeit one that has extensive capabilities in and outside of the classroom.

Some of the recent uses of virtual reality, thanks to the collaboration between universities and developers like Microsoft, have been the simulation of medical exams and VR apps that teach anatomy.
Several Tools Beat One Tool
Medicine is a practice of precision. We cannot rely on a singular modality or technology to teach us what we need to know. To do so could open the door for a decline in the level of patient care we provide. To maximize our potential as medical examiners, surgeons, and general physicians, our reliance should be on multiple educational tools, including cadaver training.

What cadavers bring to the table is the ability to observe the unique aspects of every human body. The anatomical variations are unique even between twins. To recreate these numerous variations from one person […]